Appliqué coats for two – a tutorial, now revised! and expanded!

ED NOTE: We just went to the event, and this got passed around the internet some beforehand. I had people stop me all weekend about it. There are some questions answered down below and additional notes and photos based on what I kept getting asked about and what I learned from more experienced people.

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We needed new coats, and the big, cold November event was coming fast. I’ve never made one for Kevin, my cloak is kind of falling apart, and an actual coat seems more practical than a big cloak that’s always open in the front. There was a grand sale on wool at JoAnn’s. I might have bought by the bolt. So basically? It’s like the Universe is telling me that it wants me to make us really great Norse coats.

A friend does SPECTACULAR Norse. Enviable Norse. When she was impressed with my purple Greenland gown I was over the moon. I’m always jealous of her fabulous appliqued animals but thought they would be way too hard, till I asked, and she looked at me like I was crazy. Turns out this is really easy, and while not a half hour project, it’s something I could knock out in a day. That’s much quicker than embroidering something of the same size. It’s dramatic, colorful, and adds texture and depth.

This is my coat (almost done!) on the left. Those stags are about 8″ high if not more. I think it’s taken me a couple hours of tv watching to affix each and about an afternoon to put all the green on the white. Luckily, I have fine wool yarn galore in lots of colors from that crewelwork deer project I was doing. Some quick running stitch around all the seams, slap on some deer, and I’m going to be one fancy lady at BAM!

Here I am being a fancy lady at BAM (or War of the Rams II or whatever it is now) reporting in court with their Excellencies Bordermarch. I ran a charter design competition for scribal glory, fame, and goodie baskets. I ran out of time before I got to do white stitching along the gores, but it will be even better when that happens. The coat is comfy cozy and was pretty easy!

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The Tutorial Part!

Want to be a fancy Norse person, too? It’s easy! All you need is a printer, some heavy thread or embroidery floss, a big needle, and some wool blend felt (by the yard at a fabric store or online where they sell supplies for needle felting). If you have an especially large or complex design, you’re going to want a little fabric-safe glue, like Elmer’s or Tacky Glue or quilting spray to stick those pieces together while you stitch them down.

1. Blow up the thing you want to applique to the right size and figure out what parts of the design will be the base color and what will be the accent. A lot of Norse, Celtic, Pictish, and Rus designs make this easy. There are a bunch that could work or inspire you in my Pinterest board on garb embellishments and embroidery. If you have to draw your own lines onto a silhouette, just make them a little swirly and call it a day. Make sure your pieces are wide enough to tack down. I print an extra and color it to make sure I like the way it looks.

2. Attach your accent colored pieces to your base piece. For this bird, I cut out the accent color and attached it to the base, then stitched it down since that defined the shape of the entire piece. For the deer, I cut out a whole deer, then traced it plus an allowance of about 1/4-1/3 of an inch onto the base fabric. Stitch on the accent all around. Add on details you want, like the eye.

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3. Next, cut out the whole thing and trim any jagged or pointy bits or anywhere that your tracing pen shows. Repeat with the design reversed if you want animals that face each other on either side of the coat.

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4. Add any embroidered details you want BEFORE you put it on the coat so that you’re not trying to sew through lots of layers unnecessarily. I added wing and feather details to the raven. This is a good solution for details that are too small to do as pieces of felt but add a lot to the design by being there.

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5. Pin your applique in place on the garment. TRY IT ON. Make sure you like the placement and that it doesn’t do something weird like trail into your armpit or give a man the illusion of having boobs. Once you’re happy, pin or glue it in place, then stitch all around it in a contrasting color. Make sure to pick a thread with enough weight and tenacity to stand up to the garment you’re putting it onto. My coat is all wool, and the wool thread was a breeze. Kevin’s coat is linen canvas lined in polar fleece because he’s SO hard on his clothes. It would have destroyed the wool, so I used cotton pearl thread and took lots of breaks to rest my hands, and I have vowed to never hand-sew on polar fleece again.

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6. Wear it and graciously accept your compliments. Expect to be petted.

Brilliant Tips for Success –

1. Wool and wool-blend felt is an easy choice because it won’t unravel or fray. It would be a little heavy to put on most linen but perfect for wool clothing and other heavy materials, like canvas weight linen. Even though it won’t unravel, make sure your stitches go in far enough to anchor it well and won’t pull out.

2. If I were doing mid-weight linen applique, I would use a finer thread, make much smaller stitches, and be careful to research which stitches would be best to help bind the edges. Most people do a narrow, rolled hem through a serger before doing normal woven fabrics for applique. I hate sergers, so I’ll do it the hard way…

2-a. I got to meet up with Miriel from the comments. She showed me a stunning applique’d linen tunic she was entering in the A&S contest and told me that you use fray check on the edges of all the pieces, then still use small stitches to make sure the edges are well bound so that it stands the test of time and repeated washing.

3. If you’re going to do very much of this, it’s worth looking into buying wool felt online for projects. The color range is spectacular and the prices are better than the really thick sheets for needle felting.

4. 100% wool that’s not superwash can be felted in your washing machine at home, in case you find the perfect color or REALLY want to give yourself extra work. Toss it in a zippered pillow cover. HOT HOT HOT water, a tiny bit of detergent and a couple of towels. Let it agitate for at least half an hour.

5. You want to use a crewel needle since it has a large eye and sharp point. They’re in the embroidery aisle with the other needles.

6. For a dimensional effect, combine wool blend felt that’s sold by the yard with needle felting wool, which is sold by the 12″x12″ sheet. Needle felting wool is 2-3x thicker and not so tightly felted, and it makes for a cool 3D look since it’s puffy. Your color choices on it are limited, but if you get the white/natural kind, you can easily dye it at home in the microwave or pan with Kool-Aid, RIT, or any number of other choices.

7. For BIG designs – you or your graphic designer friend can make a big design in Photoshop or Illustrator, and you can have it printed out on a large format printer or plotter at Kinko’s. You can also get your printer to do it in sections that you tape together like tiles, then cut out. Or you can use a projector. Or you can be the bravest crafter of them all and free-hand that bad boy.

Offhand flourishing lesson

In my long-term Spencerian lessons, we’ve covered all the letters of the alphabet by now and are on to the more advanced stuff. We just had our last lesson for 2013, and the focus was on flourishing. You want to talk about things that look effortless and turn out to be hard? We can talk about flourishing. The good stuff is a graceful, airy bit of pizazz. And then there’s what I do – leaden, sad, and hopelessly awkward. It’s just unnatural. I’ve known flourishing was coming, and I have been scared. Especially when your teacher spins out something like this in a few minutes, as if pulling this off would be way easier than picking up a notecard at the store:

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Basic flourishes are an integral part of Spencerian. It’s frilly. But hey! Spencerian offers up the magical world of offhand flourishing! Offhand flourishing is the ultimate decorative skill you can learn with a pointed pen. It’s daunting to look at a whole page of fanciful animals, feathers, floral sprays and swirls and think you’ll be able to figure out how to do it. Check out some of Jake Weidmann’s amazing work. Yeah… I’m supposed to be figuring out how to do that stuff.

Fortunately, it breaks down to rather simple elements you already know how to do, and the challenge is putting them together in one coherent whole. The little bits are the strokes I already know how to make for the most part, only more controlled, more precise. As it turns out, it’s a fabulous exercise to practice the pressure control on your pen without having to engage your mind in the business of letter-forms. After a few hours of sitting there doodling, we came to the conclusion that this is a splendid way to start practice sessions – very meditative.

20131118-174919.jpgThe big sprays and birds are super cool and very dramatic, but they’re not very practical for most applications. I’m a practical calligrapher, especially when it comes to how I plan to use Spencerian, which is for invitations, weddings, envelopes, and the like. Ain’t nobody got time to be making fancy turtle doves snuggling up on one of 200 envelopes…

So I got comfortable with something like this – extend some of the basic flourishes on the initial capital, then use that as a base to do something quick and small. Little floral things like this are quick. So are things that look like wheat, feathery things, and an underline that looks like a little pine bough.

Something tells me everyone is going to have very fancy tags on their Christmas presents this year…

 

I’ve got miles and miles of silk trim

The more I learn about construction methods, materials, and embellishment of Norse clothing, the more I fall in love with it. I think it’s the first style of clothing where I really enjoy the patterning and sewing process. I got a big stack of books from UT’s fine arts library and have been learning a lot.

Like that they used silk to trim garments rather than for whole cloth construction. They’d even unravel fabric for the fibers to weave trim! I have a fair bit of silk in rich, earthy colors left over from making fancy pillows for my mom. Not enough to make anything with, but too much to toss out. Turns out it’s perfect for cutting into endless strips to trim out the array of Norse clothes I’m churning out for our cold weather eventing season. Look at how gorgeous this coat is! Simple construction, simple running top stitch over the seams, but that silk makes it really special. I am all about garments with fast, simple construction that you can make look really stellar with an easy improvement.

 

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This seemed like a really good idea before I thought through how much measuring, cutting, and sewing it’s going to be for the husband’s new coat (he’s 6’8″). Or for the full skirts I favor. Blergh. It’s easier than weaving, though! And a heck of a lot cheaper than buying trim. We’ll see how the bias cut bits do after my little bias tape maker nozzle things come from Amazon.

Last night, I stitched some of the straight cut strips together to start binding the raw seams on Kevin’s coat. UGH you guys. This polar fleece lining is going to be the death of me. It was way too much for the silk to deal with and the strips were too narrow, and it took me over an hour to seam rip out one side of the coat front to get the silk off. The fleece is hell to sew through and puffy, so where the silk was too tightly stretched, it ripped like paper. Plain hems it is for that mess.

I’m going to try using them on the wool coat I made for myself. It’s much less bulky and evil. I definitely know that they’ll work well on linen and lighter wool. The main thing I learned is that I really need to not make a whole bunch of tiny stitches close together like a sewing machine makes since that essentially makes a perforated line for easy tearing. The tension shouldn’t be too tight either. It’s definitely something where I will try a scrap of silk and a scrap of ground fabric and adjust the settings on my machine before beginning on the garment.