I’ve got miles and miles of silk trim

The more I learn about construction methods, materials, and embellishment of Norse clothing, the more I fall in love with it. I think it’s the first style of clothing where I really enjoy the patterning and sewing process. I got a big stack of books from UT’s fine arts library and have been learning a lot.

Like that they used silk to trim garments rather than for whole cloth construction. They’d even unravel fabric for the fibers to weave trim! I have a fair bit of silk in rich, earthy colors left over from making fancy pillows for my mom. Not enough to make anything with, but too much to toss out. Turns out it’s perfect for cutting into endless strips to trim out the array of Norse clothes I’m churning out for our cold weather eventing season. Look at how gorgeous this coat is! Simple construction, simple running top stitch over the seams, but that silk makes it really special. I am all about garments with fast, simple construction that you can make look really stellar with an easy improvement.

 

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This seemed like a really good idea before I thought through how much measuring, cutting, and sewing it’s going to be for the husband’s new coat (he’s 6’8″). Or for the full skirts I favor. Blergh. It’s easier than weaving, though! And a heck of a lot cheaper than buying trim. We’ll see how the bias cut bits do after my little bias tape maker nozzle things come from Amazon.

Last night, I stitched some of the straight cut strips together to start binding the raw seams on Kevin’s coat. UGH you guys. This polar fleece lining is going to be the death of me. It was way too much for the silk to deal with and the strips were too narrow, and it took me over an hour to seam rip out one side of the coat front to get the silk off. The fleece is hell to sew through and puffy, so where the silk was too tightly stretched, it ripped like paper. Plain hems it is for that mess.

I’m going to try using them on the wool coat I made for myself. It’s much less bulky and evil. I definitely know that they’ll work well on linen and lighter wool. The main thing I learned is that I really need to not make a whole bunch of tiny stitches close together like a sewing machine makes since that essentially makes a perforated line for easy tearing. The tension shouldn’t be too tight either. It’s definitely something where I will try a scrap of silk and a scrap of ground fabric and adjust the settings on my machine before beginning on the garment.

 

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