Greenland Gown – Sleeves

Soooooo I got bored of yards of double herringbone and decided to do one of the sleeves for an excuse to do something different while still being productive. I needed to have a sleeve sewn up to attach into the main body and one panel of side gores to even try the thing on. It would have been smart to do that before embellishing. I was feeling brave, having done a great deal of measuring to pattern the thing, and somehow the sleeves wound up about 4 inches too long.

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20131008-163436.jpgThere’s nothing to do but chop off this beautiful sleeve, learn my lesson, and do it over. That’s ok by me. The wavy lines were totally freehand and got more inconsistent than I felt good about. Maybe the new ones will be big enough to do a little cluster of three glass beads inside each!

The good news is that the 2/3 of the dress I have stitched together and can try on seems to fit and hang very, very well. This is something of a miracle because I have an awfully hard time sewing for myself and having it come out right. I always doubt the measurements, make it bigger, and then wind up looking like I’m swimming in ill-fitting clothes that once belonged to a larger version of myself.

This dress seems like it will be pretty, comfortable, and free me up to wear fewer layers when it’s warmer here.

Greenland Gown Project

I was challenged by Mistress Magge at Laurel’s Prize to make something wonderful, practical, and beautifully worked for myself, as most of the stuff I do is for others. It’s extra sad when it comes time to show off a body of work because none of your best efforts are in your hands. Also, I tend to forget to take care of myself, and it’s good to remember that I’m important in my life and deserve the same love and generosity I show others. Enter the great Greenland Gown Project!

20131007-163901.jpgMistress Magge was kind enough to walk me through constructing an 8-gore dress from one of the Greenland finds. I desperately need to make new clothes for myself, so it was a timely challenge. I had the right amount of deep purple linen at home, so I set to work. It was simple to pattern and efficient on yardage, so I imagine I’ll make more of these.

I’ve decided to hand sew the whole thing because it’s not as fussy as my late period stuff is. And because I wanted to feel smug about it. I don’t think I’ll do all hand sewing next time, though. It’s been a very satisfying thing that’s going faster than I thought it would.

Considering that there are a lot of these seams to double herringbone, I feel like my progress is about to slow considerably…

 

King’s Gauntlets: Color

White on beige was boring me to death, so I started in on the red. I know that every hour I spend stitching is progress, but filling in the background goes faster than the white leaves and makes me feel like I’m finally getting somewhere on this! I may be procrastinating doing the goldwork for the V…

I think these are going to turn out wonderfully well in the end. I got great tips on this kind of finer embroidery and on making it ready for applique at the Laurel’s Prize Tournament this past weekend. Gotta love being able to avoid pitfalls before you even knew they existed…

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King’s Gauntlets: Progress!

I’ve been working away on the gauntlet patches every night before bed. They’re coming along nicely! I’m using Soie de Algers and am very pleased with it. It’s so lovely and soft and shiny – really, it’s hard to believe that a year ago I didn’t believe a fellow artisan when she told me that it was so nice to work with I’d never want to go back to good old DMC floss. Truth be told, I want to embroider things just so I  can work with the lovely silk. I feel very lucky to have a fancy needlework store in town that carries an abundance of silk and wool supplies.

Originally, I had bought silk plied through with a single strand of gold lamè to do the gold bits. A couple dozen hours into the first one of these patches, and I decided that I couldn’t do all this work with teensy strands of posh silks and top it with something so glaringly not medieval. So I went back to the fancy needlework store to ask about goldwork supplies. My research on or nuè made it seem like an easy solution for dealing with the gold bits, plus they’d be visually arresting.

“How hard can it be?” I said to myself. Yeah… no. Japan gold doesn’t turn a corner well. It kinks and bucks the turn. I think it took me two hours to untangle it after I thought it might work like a normal skein of embroidery floss. This little crown is actually made of evil and took another couple of frustrating hours to fill even though it’s only about the size of an Altoid. If I ever think of trying goldwork again, please remind me of how horrid this little bit of it was.

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Unfortunately, Abraham put his wet muppet mustache on the fabric before I started, so I had to redraw the lines. Turns out Micron pens are not interchangeable with any old fine felt-tip pen.

Still, I think everything is coming along well for my first fine embroidery project – and the gold looks amazing, even if it is a total pain to work with.

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King’s Gauntlets: The Beginning

I’ve been asked to do the King’s Gauntlets for the new reign. They’re an award given for service above and beyond to His Majesty. It’s an actual leather gauntlet that’s been decorated plus a framed award scroll.

For the glove, I’m doing an embroidered cipher in the style of a 13th century illuminated versal. HRM Aaron V picked which option he liked best, and I’ve gotten to work.

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Here’s the design. It’s about 3″ square, to be done in silk and attached by appliqué to the glove leather. Oh yeah… There’s two of them to do!